YOMBA
​SHOSHONE
​TRIBE


HISTORY


The Yomba Shoshone Tribe is located within the central Nevada area recognized as the Reese River Valley. Secluded in location, it is surrounded by the Shoshone and Toiyabe Mountain Ranges and runs along approximately 20 miles of the upper reaches of the sacred Reese River. The only river in the United States that runs North. ​​As part of the 1934 Indian Reorganization Act, the Yomba Shoshone Tribe was established in the mid 1930's within the original boundaries of the Shoshone Territory. However, at the time, was recognized by the four white settlements during the 1860's known as the Bowler, Doyle, Worthington and Deringer ranches. During which time, had diverted the naturally occurring water sources and meadows into irrigated ranches while allowing their livestock to graze in the surrounding mountain areas. Ultimately depleting the areas natural resources. 

During the original establishment of the Yomba Shoshone Tribe, who received its name "Yomba", meaning carrot, from the small group of Shoshone families that occupied the Reese River Valley tributaries, according to one of the traditional foods that is harvested in the area. Otherwise known by the aboriginal Shoshone people as "Mahaquaduka Bahunovi" or, the Valley of the Plant Eaters. There were approximately 15 families or 56 people who resided in the Reese River Valley, a little over one tenth of the Shoshone Indian population recorded in 1873. These Shoshone people came from the Big Smokey Valley, Duck Valley, Stillwater and Walker Lake areas of Nevada.
​ 
Separation of the Shoshone people was not an uncommon thing before the settlement of the Euro- Americans. According to some Shoshone elders and their ancestors, the Shoshone people were many and had been spotted living throughout the Great Basin, including most of Nevada as well as parts of Idaho, California, Wyoming, Arizona, Montana, Oregon, and even Colorado. However, with new white settlers taking over lands all throughout early America, the new found separation of Shoshones had caused massive uproar amongst its people because it was not by choice of the native people but by the overwhelming numbers, demands, naturally occurring and/or unlawful genocide that came with the whites. The first few families whom had regained livelihood within the Reese River Valley, Yomba Shoshone area, as defined by the 1863 Treaty of Ruby Valley, as part of the original Shoshone territories, considered themselves still, fundamentally united and are descendants of either Chief Tutuwah or Chief Cowich.

These families still reside on the Yomba Shoshone Reservation and consider themselves to be Western Shoshone people of the Yomba Shoshone Tribe, Reese River Valley. Today the Yomba Shoshone Tribe still operates on the spiritual and traditional values set forth by our ancestors.

Along with the traditional customs of the Shoshone people, being ingenuically adept, the Yomba people became skilled cow ranchers and farmers and learned how to utilize the established irrigation systems and natural landscape of the area to their advantage. Much like the irrigations systems in Ancient Egypt, the Yomba people worked long and hard to arrange a "step like" flooding system in order to accommodate water to all families in the valley. Eventually adding dams and diversions in order to better mitigate the water. Women in the valley were a main source of influence and helped in the daily chores of the men, as well as performing their own chores such as cooking, fetching water for cleanliness, milking cows and taking care of the children.   

As time progressed​​  ​​


​​​  ​​  


​​

​​ 

​​

​​